Power House – Object Conservation

Prior to installation of a new exhibition the objects which will appear on display have to be carefully cared for by the Conservation Team. Nyssa Mildwaters, one of the Royal Armouries Conservators, will be blogging about several interesting items which will soon be on display at the Tower of London.

One of the more unusual looking objects being conserved for the Power House exhibition is a three stemmed candlestick.  The main body of the candlestick is made from metal weapon parts which twisted and fused together during the blaze which destroyed the Grand Storehouse at the Tower of London on the 30th of October 1841.

Candlestick made from debris of the fire at the Tower of London in 1841

Candlestick made from debris of the fire at the Tower of London in 1841

Large numbers of weapons and other historic objects were destroyed by the fire, however in the weeks that followed tables were set up in what was left of the building and pieces of bizarrely twisted and shaped metal debris were sold off to members of the public at prices of up to £1 each.

This particular piece of debris was converted into a candlestick by drilling into the lump and then screwing on the three decorative stems, which as you can see have a very different appearance to the twisted and misshapen metal below. Although it is not possible to identify all the metal components which fused together forming the centre of the candlestick, yet to one side there is still clearly visible the remains of the lock or firing mechanism from a flintlock rifle.

Very little remedial conservation work was actually needed to get this object ready for display as it was already in pretty good condition if a little dusty. The dust and any dirt were removed using solvents swabs, after which the whole object was coated with a protective layer of Micro-Crystalline Wax. This was achieved by using a technique called ‘hot waxing’, where the wax is warmed during application to give a better and more even coating.  With conservation complete the candlestick is now awaiting packaging and transport to the Tower of London, ready for display.

The Naming of the Dragon

A fabulous “bejewelled” dragon – standing 3m high and specially commissioned by the Royal Armouries and Historic Royal Palaces – will create a guaranteed “wow factor” as the centrepiece of the Power House exhibition at the Tower of London.

A modern trophy, the dragon is made up of components representing each of the great institutions of state associated with the Tower. The design is still being finalised but the majestic beast is likely to include:

Power House Dragon

Power House Dragon

  • Ordnance Office – armour, swords, firearms and cannon to create the back legs and body
  • Menagerie – a cage for the ribcage
  • Prison – chains to create the tail
  • The Royal Mint – coins to represent the dragon’s fire
  • The Observatory – telescopes for front legs
  • The Records Office and Ordnance Survey – parchments and maps for wings
  • The Jewel House – fake diamonds and rubies for the dragon’s eyes

This is your chance to make history – a prestigious dragon such as this deserves a befitting name. The Royal Armouries has teamed up with History™ for your opportunity to win an exclusive behind the scenes tour of the Tower of London and two tickets to the VIP private view of the Power House exhibition.

To enter please suggest a name for the dragon by emailing the Royal Armouries at competitions@armouries.org.uk. Please include your name and telephone number on the email. The competition closing date is Thursday 31 March 2011. Terms and Conditions are available on the History™ website.

Power House Work Begins

Work has begun at the Tower of London on the installation of the new exhibition – Power House. The exhibitions ‘Prisoners and Punishment’ and ‘Hands on History’ which have been running on the top floor of the White Tower, closed on 28 February. Over four days Royal Armouries staff carefully removed collection objects to safe storage leaving an empty shell of cases and structures.

Hands on History Gallery, Tower of London

Hands on History Gallery, Tower of London

The core design team is continuing to work on the interpretation panels, with graphic amendments and text approvals as the deadline for print and production rapidly approaches.

There is a moment in any project where there is a pause – a brief moment of calm between preparation and installation – before the real hard work begins and does not stop until the handover of the exhibition to the operations team. At 7.30am on the morning of 7th March, that moment arrived and by 8am had passed again as the installation team from Paragon Creative arrived, unloaded a van full of tools and set about dismantling the existing structures.

Prisoners and Punishment Gallery, Tower of London

Prisoners and Punishment Gallery, Tower of London

This was swiftly followed by the first meeting of the Royal Armouries project installation team. A project as big as this requires the expertise of a broad spectrum of Museum staff – a combination of skills from both our Leeds Museum and from the Tower – including display technicians, curators, conservationists and registrars.

The next week provides the team with the chance to make final preparations prior to object installation – ensuring all the bespoke mounts and plinths made by the in-house display technicians are complete and labelled up ready to be matched with each object and case.

Tower of London: Power House

Discover the stories and personalities behind the major organisations of state, who took care of Royal business from within the mighty Tower of London’s walls from 1100 to the present day in our upcoming Power House exhibition.

Power House – which opens on the White Tower’s top floor on Saturday 2nd April in partnership with Historic Royal Palaces – showcases the roles of the major organisations that provided the bedrock of England’s power throughout the centuries.

Power House

Power House

Great institutions include the Ordnance Office, Ordnance Survey, the Royal Mint, Record Office, the Jewel House, Menagerie and Royal Observatory. The exhibition will also put the spotlight on other Tower of London functions, ranging from royal residence to state prison.

The Tower has been home to many important national institutions for over 900 years and was viewed as a fortress and symbol of England’s might. Close to the seat of Royal power at Westminster, the Tower became England’s ultimate Power House – and the functions it housed were vital to whether successive monarchs kept or lost control of the kingdom.

We’ll be following the progress of the exhibition’s installation throughout March with posts from our Head of Creative Programmes Karen Whitting.