Meet the Jouster: Ben van Koert

non_armourAged: 35

Height: 167cm

Weight: 75kg

Jousting since: 2011

Personal best/highlight: won the Arundel International Tournament Joust 2013 chivalry prize. Highlight – Arundel International Tournament Team Champion 2014.

Motto: ‘Per Aspera Ad Astra’ (“Through hardships to the stars”).

Strength: Meticulous

By day: System and network administrator in a school

By knight:

Ben has been involved with the the world of re-enactment and historical interpretation since 1999, and part of leading interpretations of medieval war and tournament both on foot and on horse in Germany, Belgium, the UK, the USA, Australia and, of course, in his native Netherlands.

He has participated in medieval jousting events in the Netherlands, the UK, and Australia. He won the chivalry prize at the Arundel Castle International Tournament in 2013, and was a team champion the following year.

Ben’s talents also extend to fire-artistry, and he has recently produced videos of jousting and re-enacting at events as Kaos Historical Media.

This will be his first time at the Royal Armouries.

To see Ben in action, book your tickets to the Easter Tournament on our website or by calling bookings on 0113 220 1888.

Day tickets cost from £10 for adults and £5 for concessions!

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Ben Van Kurt's colours

Ben Van Kurt’s colours

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On_Horse

Meet the Jouster: Steve R. Gagnon

Age: 50 00770_Steve_Gagnon_buste

Height: 188cm

Weight: 99kg

Jousting since: 2000

Team: Burgundy

Personal best/highlight: Best jouster in King John III International Tournament, Poland, 2013 against 11 of the world’s top jousters.

Strength: Overall strength and calmness.

Weakness: Training – In Quebec, long winters make it very difficult to joust as regularly and often as Europeans.

Motto: Ubi tenebræ sunt, ego sum (Where the darkness lies, I am)

By day: Art & Creative Advertising Director

By knight:

Developed jousting tournaments for sport and historical divisions, especially with the creation of the Lys d’Argent International Jousting Tournament, 2010. Steve has competed in Belgium, France, Poland, England, USA and Canada and won the Lys d’Argent international jousting tournament in 2012 with his teammates Marc Hamel and Patrice Rolland.

Steve is a pioneer in equestrian jousting in Québec and creator and organiser of medieval festivals for the past nine years. He lives in the countryside of Montreal on a ranch where he trains horses for historical jousting competitions.

Extra talents: Drawing, painting and sculpting.

To see Steve in action, book your tickets on our website or by calling bookings on 0113 220 1888.

Day tickets cost from £10 for adults and £5 for concessions!

Steve Gagnon's arms

Steve Gagnon’s arms

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de sable et d’argent

Meet the Jouster: Jan Gradon

Age: 3411050957_10206262886357958_1358098300_n

Height: 194cm

Weight: 100kg

Jousting since: 2007

Team: Poland

Personal best/highlight: highest individual score at Tournament of the Phoenix, USA 2011, the second individual position at Arundel International Tournament 2013 and Skill at Arms competition champion at Arundel 2014

Motto: “Amor Vincit Omnia” (Love Conquers All)

Strength: Composure

By day: Office General Manager

By knight:

Jan began his career in 1996 with historical re-enactment on foot, and then got on a horse in 2005. He’s trained in full-contact medieval foot combat, portrayed an Ulhan cavalry-man of the 19th century Grand Ducy of Warsaw, and rode as a knight at Europe’s largest battle re-enactments, the battles of Tannenberg (Poland) and Hastings (UK).

As a member of Xiazeca Druzyna, a Polish historical mounted display team, Jan competes in tournaments across Europe and America. In 2011 he burst into the top ranks of the international jousting scene in style by winning America’s most prestigious competition, the Tournament of the Phoenix, California.

2013 saw Jan compete at the Arundel International Tournament in the Holy Roman Empire team, at which he gained the second individual position, and the following year he returned under the banner of his home country and won the Skills at Arms individual competition.

This will be Jan’s first appearance at the Royal Armouries Tournament.

To see Jan in action, book your tickets on our website or by calling bookings on 0113 220 1888.

Day tickets cost from £10 for adults and £5 for concessions!

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Jan Gradon’s colours.

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C: Stephen Moss photography

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C: ARW Photography

 

Curator about & about: The Buff Coat of Sir Thomas Fairfax in York Castle Museum

From Keith Dowen, Assistant Curator of European Armour.

Recently I was very fortunate to be invited to examine the 17th century buff-leather coat reputed to have belonged to Parliamentary commander Sir Thomas Fairfax at the York Castle Museum. Fairfax was a highly talented and respected commander and is chiefly remembered for his victories over the Royalists at the battles of Marston Moor in 1644, Naseby in 1645 and the Siege of Oxford in 1645-1646.

Between the late 16th century and the Civil Wars (1642-1651) the amount of armour worn by soldiers on the battlefield gradually decreased. Armourers responded to the increase in the use and effectiveness of gunpowder weapons by making some armour thicker and thus heavier in order to provide better protection. The nature of warfare at this time was also changing; battlefield tactics emphasised smaller formations and lighter, faster moving troops. As a result soldiers discarded elements of armour that were felt to be too heavy or cumbersome.

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By the time of the Civil Wars, the lightly armoured ‘harquebusier’ had become the principal type of cavalryman on the battlefield. Usually armed with a sword and a short-barrelled firearm or pair of pistols, his defensive arms could comprise a back and breastplate and a type of helmet we often call a ‘lobster pot’. Such soldiers are popularly associated with the Parliamentarian side during the Civil Wars and are widely known as ‘Roundheads’, yet in reality harquebusiers were used by both sides. One item of defensive wear sometimes worn by harquebusiers was the ‘buff coat’. Made from oil-tanned leather, often cow or deer, buff coats provided good protection against edged weapons and flying debris whilst at the same time being relatively light-weight. 17th century portraits can be somewhat misleading at times, as many men chose to be depicted in full armour in order to associate themselves with the knightly figures of the past. Whilst it is true that some commanders continued to wear full armour on the battlefield, the majority chose to wear buff coats in the manner of harquebusiers.

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The first task undertaken by Dr Prior and Helen Thornton, of York Museums Trust and fashion student Glynis Hughs and myself was to assess the general condition of the coat and the main elements which it was made from. We found that the coat comprised eight pieces of buff-leather, one piece of thick felt for the collar, two sleeves made of a peach-coloured silk and braid made of gold and silver wrapped silk threads. Sixteen lacing holes ran down the front of the coat for the addition of decorative silk laces. Rust stains on the inside of the coat indicated where hooks and eyes were once located to fasten the coat together. Overall the coat was of medium size measuring approximately 43cm across the back of the shoulders and with a collar size of 46cm. Unlike most buff coats which would have been worn over a doublet, this one appears to have been worn over just a shirt as a waist-band had been sewn to the inside for the attachment of a pair of breeches.

Overall the design of the coat and style of braid points to a date of manufacture of around 1635-40. Between 1639 and 1640 Fairfax took part in the so-called ‘Bishops’ Wars’ against Scotland and led a company of Yorkshire dragoons. It is therefore possible that this coat was worn at that time as there is another coat said to have belonged to Fairfax at Leeds Castle in Kent which dates to around 1640-1650.

Though it was initially expected that the front of the coat would be thicker than the back, as any attack was more likely to come from this direction, the measurements we took did not reflect this (ranging from 4-9mm front and back). However, at the time of the assessment measurements were only able to be taken along the edges of the leather panels.

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Depending on the taste and purse of the individual, buff-coats could be either left plain or decorated. At first sight the applied braid on Fairfax’s buff-coat appeared rather dull, but when we lifted the arm the braid which had not been exposed to light shone-out brilliantly as bright as the day it was made. To say we all let out a gasp of amazement would be a bit of an understatement!

My special thanks to Dr M Prior of York Castle Museum for making the coat available for study and for such a rewarding day.

 

 

Conservation Live! at the Royal Armouries: Siborne’s Waterloo Model

Conservation of Captain William Siborne’s remarkable model of the battlefield of Waterloo is now underway at the Royal Armouries in Leeds.

Conservation Live! of the miniature soldiers of Waterloo.

Conservation Live! of the miniature soldiers of Waterloo.

The model, which was completed in 1843, shows – in marvellous detail – the battlefield as it was at around 1:30pm on 18 June 1815. It is more than five metres long and two metres wide, and it comes apart into ten sections. The battlefield is populated by more than 3,000 finely modelled and painted lead figures including soldiers, horses and artillery.

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Section of the model before conservation.

The model has been on display at the Royal Armouries since 1996. Now, in advance of the bicentenary of the battle, it is being dismantled and conserved piece by piece as part of a Conservation Live! programme.

Cleaning the thousands of models on the battlefield is a slow and careful process.

Cleaning the thousands of models on the battlefield is a slow and careful process.

British soldiers in miniature - look closely and you can see their individual faces!

British soldiers in miniature – look closely and you can see their individual faces!

A Waterloo soldier supports his wounded companion.

A Waterloo soldier supports his wounded companion.

The detail on each figure has to be seen to be believed.

The detail on each figure has to be seen to be believed.

Conservator Cymbeline Storey working on the model.

Conservator Cymbeline Storey working on the model.

From March until May 1st 2015 museum visitors can meet the Conservator, discuss the conservation programme and watch conservation of the model taking place. At 11:00 and 2:00 visitors can attend talks with the Conservator, which is ticketed due to limited access, or simply drop in between 2:30-3:30pm. For more information on how to take part please ring the Royal Armouries on 0113 220 1999 or email enquiries@armouries.org.uk. Alternatively, keep your eye out for further blog posts over the next few months as conservation work progresses

Cymbeline Storey
Waterloo Model Conservator

 

In conversation with: Strong Voices

lightfever

‘Light Fever’ is a powerful new photographic exhibition showcasing the innovative and inspiring work of local teenagers, currently open at Royal Armouries Museum at Fort Nelson, in partnership with Artswork, Butterfly FX, and Portsmouth Autism Support Network.

With the exhibition coming to a close this Saturday 21 February, we asked Strong Voices member Jack Halsall to share his experiences of creating the exhibition.

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© ButterflyFX

 

How did you become involved in the project?

I was part of the group of teenagers who did the Bronze Arts Award with Strong Voices. That was about The Lost World and we did a lot of it in the City Museum. I really enjoyed that and wanted to be part of the Silver Arts Award at Fort Nelson.

What was your favourite picture you created for the show and how did you do it?

The Creeper. I like the way it is coming towards the viewer. I’m really pleased with the way that it worked out. I did it using stencils, which was quite tricky and a lot of work so I’m glad it was worth it.

‘The Creeper’. © ButterflyFX

 

There are lots of different styles of light graffiti in the different pictures, did you need to use different techniques to get these effects?

Yes, for some of the pictures we used stencils, and for others outlining objects and freestyle, which was basically just throwing lights around and seeing what they looked like afterwards.

Which technique did you most enjoy doing and do you think it was the most effective?

The most fun was freestyle. Stencils were the trickiest to do, but if they were done correctly they were the most effective.

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© ButterflyFX

dragon breathe

© ButterflyFX

 

When people who don’t know a lot about digital art, look at the final images, we don’t really understand how much work has gone into it at the editing stage. Tell me about what happens between the camera and the finished project.

I’d like to use the image of the skull as an example. We took lots of photos of the skull with different lights (some red, some green, some white) and then we merged them together when we were editing and it was really effective. I enjoy using Photoshop to edit and enhance images.

skull-of-DEATH!

© ButterflyFX

 

Has working on this project changed your opinion of museums? If so, how?

I’ve always liked visiting museums but this gave me a whole new view of museums because I realised that there could be lots of places that I don’t normally get to see. It was really interesting to be in the museum after it was closed and the tunnels were all dark. The tunnels were epic places to do light graffiti. Not only were they really dark but also they were full of atmosphere and the feeling of being very old. We had a lot of fun things stored at Fort Nelson. We used the old skull to produce a brilliant piece of artwork. We also used swords and armour. My favourite one was when it looked as though electric was coming out of the sword.

How did you feel when you saw the final exhibition?

I was impressed by how good it looked. For the first time I could see it as a professional exhibition. I feel very proud of it and so were the other people who were putting it up.

light fever install image

© ButterflyFX

 

Light Fever is part of the ARTSWORK (hyperlink to artswork website) Strong Voices programme; a two year national programme funded by the Department for Education through their Voluntary and Community Sector prospectus. Strong Voices seeks to increase the numbers of young people accessing the resources offered by England’s Major partner Museums and National Portfolio Organisations.

Otley War Memorial research

As part of our project on the history and memory of the First World War our team of adult learners, pictured above, is researching some of the names from the Otley war memorials.

Adult learners

There are several memorials in Otley to those who served in the First World War: a memorial plaque in the Parish Church; a memorial in Otley Methodist Church on Boroughgate and one in Our Lady and All Saints Catholic Church on Bridge Street. We’ve chosen six soldiers from the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment who are listed on the Otley memorials to find out more about. Most of our soldiers served on the Western Front and none survived the war.

In researching our soldiers we’ve made use of battalion war diaries, official records and memoirs of men who served in the same battalion at the same time to try to reconstruct their war service and the circumstances of their deaths. We’ve also investigated their family backgrounds using online census data and parish records. However, we know next to nothing about what kind of people they were. We don’t have photographs of any of them. While most of them died unmarried and therefore don’t have descendants that we know of, we are aware that there might be families in and around Otley who have connections to some of these men.

Do you recognise any of the names below? Do you have a family connection to any of them? If you have any information, anecdotes or family stories that could help our research we’d love to hear from you.

Joseph Bona was a Company Sergeant Major in the 10th battalion Duke of Wellington’s Regiment. He was killed on 18 October 1917 aged 25 and is listed on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Fred Chippendale served at Gallipoli with the 8th Battalion. He was injured and subsequently died of dysentery on 22 September 1915. He is buried in the Cario War Memorial Cemetery.

Edgar Mudd is the only one of our soldiers for whom we’ve been able to find regimental records online. When he attested for the army in december 1915 he stated he was willing to serve “for any service where my being blind in one eye is not detrimental”. Edgar served with the 1/7 Battalion and was killed in action in France on 3 July 1916. He is named on the Thiepval Memorial.

Walter Rollin was born in Halifax and served with the 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington’s Regiment. He was killed on 3 March 1917 and is buried in Fins New British Cemetery, Sorel-le-Grand.

William Simpson served with the 2/5th and later the 5th battalion. He was killed in action aged 33 on 7 November 1918, just days before th war ended. He is buried at Maugeuge-Centre cemetery, having been exhumed from his original resting place in Mecquigeines churchyard and reburied there in 1950. The exhumation report includes his dental records and states that William’s size 9 leather boots and a jerkin insignia of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment were still on his body, together with a pocket knife and various coins.

William Swainston served with the 9th Battalion and was killed on 2 March 1916. He was originally buried in Zillebike and was exhumed and reburied in Sanctuary Wood Cemetery in 1927.