Power House Work Begins

Work has begun at the Tower of London on the installation of the new exhibition – Power House. The exhibitions ‘Prisoners and Punishment’ and ‘Hands on History’ which have been running on the top floor of the White Tower, closed on 28 February. Over four days Royal Armouries staff carefully removed collection objects to safe storage leaving an empty shell of cases and structures.

Hands on History Gallery, Tower of London

Hands on History Gallery, Tower of London

The core design team is continuing to work on the interpretation panels, with graphic amendments and text approvals as the deadline for print and production rapidly approaches.

There is a moment in any project where there is a pause – a brief moment of calm between preparation and installation – before the real hard work begins and does not stop until the handover of the exhibition to the operations team. At 7.30am on the morning of 7th March, that moment arrived and by 8am had passed again as the installation team from Paragon Creative arrived, unloaded a van full of tools and set about dismantling the existing structures.

Prisoners and Punishment Gallery, Tower of London

Prisoners and Punishment Gallery, Tower of London

This was swiftly followed by the first meeting of the Royal Armouries project installation team. A project as big as this requires the expertise of a broad spectrum of Museum staff – a combination of skills from both our Leeds Museum and from the Tower – including display technicians, curators, conservationists and registrars.

The next week provides the team with the chance to make final preparations prior to object installation – ensuring all the bespoke mounts and plinths made by the in-house display technicians are complete and labelled up ready to be matched with each object and case.

Tower of London: Power House

Discover the stories and personalities behind the major organisations of state, who took care of Royal business from within the mighty Tower of London’s walls from 1100 to the present day in our upcoming Power House exhibition.

Power House – which opens on the White Tower’s top floor on Saturday 2nd April in partnership with Historic Royal Palaces – showcases the roles of the major organisations that provided the bedrock of England’s power throughout the centuries.

Power House

Power House

Great institutions include the Ordnance Office, Ordnance Survey, the Royal Mint, Record Office, the Jewel House, Menagerie and Royal Observatory. The exhibition will also put the spotlight on other Tower of London functions, ranging from royal residence to state prison.

The Tower has been home to many important national institutions for over 900 years and was viewed as a fortress and symbol of England’s might. Close to the seat of Royal power at Westminster, the Tower became England’s ultimate Power House – and the functions it housed were vital to whether successive monarchs kept or lost control of the kingdom.

We’ll be following the progress of the exhibition’s installation throughout March with posts from our Head of Creative Programmes Karen Whitting.

Japanese Swords on Twitter

Japanese, 15th century katana - attributed to the Shizu group

Japanese katana - 15th century

Our ever popular Japanese Swords Seminar is taking place on Saturday 12 February, in fact it’s so popular that tickets have sold out! But don’t despair, even if you didn’t manage to get hold of a ticket, as  we’ll be Tweeting events live as they happen throughout the day.

This session, delivered by Keeper of Armour & Oriental Collections Thom Richardson, and Curator Emeritus Ian Bottomley, will give participants a unique chance to learn about the making and care of these important cultural objects. Including the chance to handle genuine objects from our study collections which are not usually on display.

To join simply follow @Royal_Armouries on Twitter or search for #RAseminars on Twitter to follow the day’s events as they unfold. We’d love to hear any questions you have about our Japanese sword collection so please ask away, on the day or in advance – we’re waiting to hear from you!

 

Collections Up Close January

Pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry sword

Pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry sword

This pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry sword was presented to Henry Wiley Middleton on 1 January 1864. The sword is allegedly that of Sgt John Shaw of the Life Guards who ‘killed 13 men at the Battle of Waterloo’. However, it is recorded that Shaw’s sword broke in the battle and he had to resort to killing the last of the 13 Frenchmen with his helmet! This may have been another of Shaw’s swords or later attributed to him. It was later presented by Col. Mc Vicar to E. Young Esq, M.D., who then gave it to his grandson Henry in 1864, adding the inscription to record the sword’s interesting history.

Blogger: Angela Clare, Researcher

Collections Up Close December

Saxony armour

In 1591, as a Christmas present for her husband, the Elector Christian I of Saxony, the Electress Sophia commissioned twelve special armours to be made for him. Unfortunately, Christian I died in September 1591 before receiving these gifts. One of the armours, a half-armour made for foot combat at the barriers, is in the Royal Armouries collection. The helmet is currently on display in the Tournament Gallery in our Leeds Museum.The armour retains its original blued finish and is etched and gilt with decoration.

Blogger: Angela Clare, Researcher