Keeper of the Tower Armouries, Bridget Clifford, continues her posts on Charles John Ffoulkes, who was Curator of the Armouries from 1913-1938 – during which he took part in the World War I civil defence of London, completed the first and last complete modern printed catalogue of the Tower collection, and created a museum infrastructure within The Tower. After his retirement, he was awarded an OBE in 1925 and a CBE in 1934 in recognition of his work on the Imperial War Museum.

image 1 curator to war blog.

September 1914 brought with it the reality of war as ffoulkes matter of factly recorded the departure of the first of his staff to serve King and Country.

Foreman William Henry Noble Buckingham joined the Tower as a Carpenter, and the first Armouries record we have of him is a signed piece of glass paper retrieved from inside XVII.12 (one of the wooden horses made for the Line of Kings at the Tower)  which reads “Repaired August 1893 By W Buckingham Carpenter”.  As Armouries Foreman he was responsible for the oversight of the 11 Armouries staff and the maintenance of the displays in the White Tower which ffoulkes was gradually modernising. A keen volunteer artilleryman, he had served in 1900 with the City Imperial Volunteers in the South African War (1899 -1902).  He re-enlisted in 1914 with the rank of Battery Sergeant-Major, Field Artillery and was sent to Peterborough with the Reserve Battery of the 1st Essex Battery. He fell ill in March 1915 and was given 3 weeks leave, dying on “the very hour” he should have returned to duty.

And cleaner W. Williams? He marched off to war, and apparent oblivion.  The Armouries records make no further mention of him or his fate.

Ten days later the 2nd Battalion the Scots Guards marched out of the Tower led by Col Bolton and a military band.

Ffoulkes watches the Guards leave for camp at Lyndhurst in the New Forest – he’s the bare headed gent standing on the Water Lane pavement to the left of the picture, 5th chap up with prominent white collar. Photographer Sgt Christopher Pilkington.
Ffoulkes watches the Guards leave for camp at Lyndhurst in the New Forest – he’s the bare headed gent standing on the Water Lane pavement to the left of the picture, 5th chap up with prominent white collar. Photographer Sgt Christopher Pilkington.

Staff Sergeant Christopher Pilkington was attached to the 2nd Battalion the Scots Guards and more of his unique record of their early war experience can be seen on the Imperial War Museum’s website. Ffoulkes was not averse to keeping a photographic record of his exploits, and a copy of this photograph was pasted into his album following on from earlier ones showing his return of local militia colours.

At the end of the month, Lionel Earle’s visit conferred both the official seal of approval on ffoulkes labours to modernise the displays and a timely reminder that life must go on even in the face of war.

Blogger: Bridget Clifford, Keeper of Tower Armouries

For details of the Royal Armouries’ First World War Centenary programme visit the website.