lightfever

‘Light Fever’ is a powerful new photographic exhibition showcasing the innovative and inspiring work of local teenagers, currently open at Royal Armouries Museum at Fort Nelson, in partnership with Artswork, Butterfly FX, and Portsmouth Autism Support Network.

With the exhibition coming to a close this Saturday 21 February, we asked Strong Voices member Jack Halsall to share his experiences of creating the exhibition.

IMG_7465_1
© ButterflyFX

 

How did you become involved in the project?

I was part of the group of teenagers who did the Bronze Arts Award with Strong Voices. That was about The Lost World and we did a lot of it in the City Museum. I really enjoyed that and wanted to be part of the Silver Arts Award at Fort Nelson.

What was your favourite picture you created for the show and how did you do it?

The Creeper. I like the way it is coming towards the viewer. I’m really pleased with the way that it worked out. I did it using stencils, which was quite tricky and a lot of work so I’m glad it was worth it.

‘The Creeper’. © ButterflyFX

 

There are lots of different styles of light graffiti in the different pictures, did you need to use different techniques to get these effects?

Yes, for some of the pictures we used stencils, and for others outlining objects and freestyle, which was basically just throwing lights around and seeing what they looked like afterwards.

Which technique did you most enjoy doing and do you think it was the most effective?

The most fun was freestyle. Stencils were the trickiest to do, but if they were done correctly they were the most effective.

aoa wheel on fire
© ButterflyFX
dragon breathe
© ButterflyFX

 

When people who don’t know a lot about digital art, look at the final images, we don’t really understand how much work has gone into it at the editing stage. Tell me about what happens between the camera and the finished project.

I’d like to use the image of the skull as an example. We took lots of photos of the skull with different lights (some red, some green, some white) and then we merged them together when we were editing and it was really effective. I enjoy using Photoshop to edit and enhance images.

skull-of-DEATH!
© ButterflyFX

 

Has working on this project changed your opinion of museums? If so, how?

I’ve always liked visiting museums but this gave me a whole new view of museums because I realised that there could be lots of places that I don’t normally get to see. It was really interesting to be in the museum after it was closed and the tunnels were all dark. The tunnels were epic places to do light graffiti. Not only were they really dark but also they were full of atmosphere and the feeling of being very old. We had a lot of fun things stored at Fort Nelson. We used the old skull to produce a brilliant piece of artwork. We also used swords and armour. My favourite one was when it looked as though electric was coming out of the sword.

How did you feel when you saw the final exhibition?

I was impressed by how good it looked. For the first time I could see it as a professional exhibition. I feel very proud of it and so were the other people who were putting it up.

light fever install image
© ButterflyFX

 

Light Fever is part of the ARTSWORK (hyperlink to artswork website) Strong Voices programme; a two year national programme funded by the Department for Education through their Voluntary and Community Sector prospectus. Strong Voices seeks to increase the numbers of young people accessing the resources offered by England’s Major partner Museums and National Portfolio Organisations.