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On 29 March 1461 the largest and bloodiest battle of the Wars of the Roses was fought about 12 miles southwest of York, between the villages of Towton and Saxton. According to the chroniclers more than 50,000 soldiers from the Houses of York & Lancaster fought in blizzard conditions on Palm Sunday 550 years ago. On Saturday 9 April join us on Twitter from our Towton History In Your Hands Seminar to learn more about the arms and armour of theRead more

Collections Up Close March

In March 44BC Julius Caesar was warned to ‘Beware the ides of March’. Caesar dismissed the warning that harm would come to him, only to be stabbed to death later that day by Senators in the Roman Senate. The ‘ides of March’ refers to March 15th in the Roman calendar, and is probably linked to the full moon as the ides fall on either the 13th or 15th day of each month. The prediction and Caesar’s fate were later dramatisedRead more

Collections Up Close February

As St Valentine’s Day, a celebration of love and romance, is celebrated this month we’re taking a closer look at a rather beautiful object . In the Royal Armouries collection is a richly decorated pistol, its many amorous motifs suggest that it is a lover’s gift. It was most likely made purely for show rather than for actual use. The decoration includes a sprig of forget-me-nots and the inscription ‘VER GIS MEIN NIT’ (forget me not). The forget-me-not flower isRead more

Collections Up Close January

This pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry sword was presented to Henry Wiley Middleton on 1 January 1864. The sword is allegedly that of Sgt John Shaw of the Life Guards who ‘killed 13 men at the Battle of Waterloo’. However, it is recorded that Shaw’s sword broke in the battle and he had to resort to killing the last of the 13 Frenchmen with his helmet! This may have been another of Shaw’s swords or later attributed to him. It wasRead more

Collections Up Close December

In 1591, as a Christmas present for her husband, the Elector Christian I of Saxony, the Electress Sophia commissioned twelve special armours to be made for him. Unfortunately, Christian I died in September 1591 before receiving these gifts. One of the armours, a half-armour made for foot combat at the barriers, is in the Royal Armouries collection. The helmet is currently on display in the Tournament Gallery in our Leeds Museum.The armour retains its original blued finish and is etchedRead more

Collections Up Close November

Our Leeds Museum houses items which belonged to Private Thomas Queenan, who was killed on 4th June 1916 while serving in France. He lived near the site of our Leeds Museum and several of his belongings were donated by his family, including his 1914 Star, War and Victory medals, and his Queen Mary’s Christmas Box which contained a souvenir handkerchief of his West Yorkshire Regiment. Queenan was just one of many thousands of men from the region who lost theirRead more