Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s campaign for better armour on the Western Front: Part three

  Part Three: Private Companies Written by Philip Abbot  Archives and Records Manager for the Royal Armouries in Leeds. At least eighteen designs for armour using steel plate, mail and even textiles were manufactured commercially in Britain during the First Word War, and no less than forty patents for helmets and armour were taken out in … Continue reading Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s campaign for better armour on the Western Front: Part three

The Curator @ War: 20 March 1915 “Foreman Buckingham: the Last Post” (part II)

Keeper of the Tower Armouries, Bridget Clifford, continues her posts on Charles John Ffoulkes, who was Curator of the Armouries from 1913-1938 – during which he took part in the World War I civil defence of London, completed the first and last complete modern printed catalogue of the Tower collection, and created a museum infrastructure within The Tower. After … Continue reading The Curator @ War: 20 March 1915 “Foreman Buckingham: the Last Post” (part II)

War memorials

Why do war memorials look the way they do? The War Memorials Trust estimates that there are 100,000 war memorials in the UK, and many of them follow a similar range of designs. There's the statue of an infantryman, as in the memorial in Otley. There's the Cenotaph style memorials that mimic the original design … Continue reading War memorials

Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, aka the Tower Poppies

The art installation 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red', by Paul Cummins and Tom Piper, is to date the UK's most viewed and probably most controversial commemorative act of the First World War centenary (though it could yet be surpassed: there are still nearly four more years to go!). The work consisted of 888,246 ceramic poppies, each representing … Continue reading Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, aka the Tower Poppies