The Line of Kings: 1685-1785

Having existed in one form or another for over 400 years, the Line of Kings is one of the world’s oldest exhibitions. Having been re-arranged countless times over the centuries at the whims of monarchs and curators, the latest display allows visitors to enjoy some of our most spectacular items. In this series of blog posts, we’ll bring you the story of how the Line of Kings has transformed from 1547 right through to the present day. James II cameRead more

The Line of Kings: 1547-1685

Having existed in one form or another for over 400 years, the Line of Kings is one of the world’s oldest exhibitions. Having been re-arranged countless times over the centuries at the whims of monarchs and curators, the latest display allows visitors to enjoy some of our most spectacular items. In this series of blog posts, we’ll bring you the story of how the Line of Kings has transformed from 1547 right through to the present day. Long before theRead more

Spies in the Tower: Fernando Buschmann

In the run up to our Spy Academy running throughout half term at Fort Nelson, Bridget Clifford recounts the stories of just some of the men held in the Tower of London on espionage charges during the First World War. NB: This post first appeared in November 2014 as part of our The Curator @ War series. Fernando Buschmann was the seventh of eleven spies shot at the Tower of London between November 1914 and April 1916, and at 25Read more

Spies in the Tower: Carl Hans Lody

In the run up to our Spy Academy running throughout half term at Fort Nelson, Bridget Clifford recounts the stories of just some of the men held in the Tower of London on espionage charges during the First World War. NB: This post was originally published in November 2014 as part of our The Curator @ War series. Three months into the First World War as the combatants on the Western Front learnt the grim reality of trench warfare inRead more

St George in the Armouries

As you might suspect St George makes appearances throughout our collection but never more splendidly as on the silvered and engraved armour of King Henry VII, as Keeper of Tower Armouries, Bridget Clifford, explains. You don’t get more English than St George do you? Well perhaps Henry VIII, the tubby bloke with poor marital history – six wives: divorced, beheaded, died, divorced, beheaded, survived – who usually tops the polls of monarchs people remember. So for the quintessential depiction ofRead more

Arms, Armour and Gender | Diversity in Warfare

In the 1970s, arms and armour were a man’s world both in use and study. As a recent graduate in 1977, I was fortunate to get a toe hold on the bottom rung of the curatorial ladder in the Department of Weapons and Antiquities at the National Maritime Museum. The weapons side of the Department was all female, and as my boss had a preference for the uniform collection and had mastered its complicated identification coding, I was more thanRead more